Artist Statement:

  • Most animators draw their films frame by frame or model and animate them using 3D software.  I collect, grow, and scavenge my frames. Subtle differences (genetic variability) between one frame or specimen and the next create hypnotic, pulsing motion.
  • I imagined that since the imagery for my films already existed and didn’t have to be created from scratch I’d discovered some clever shortcut in the animation process.  I hadn’t.  The flatbed scanner I use to create the grainy, surrealist images can take up to 20 minutes to complete a 2400 dpi pass. I spend weeks, sometimes months, in After Effects arranging and correcting thousands of images. My process is just as tedious as any of the more traditional forms of animation.
  • Conveniently though common plants and weeds like Oxalis pes caprae, Medicago polymorpha, Salvia lyrata, Lamium purpureum, or Ipomoea cairica are little films growing right outside my front door. 

2 Responses to About

  1. Francesca says:

    Hi David,
    Got your comment from Vimeo, thanks! Yes, I was just at Strange Beauty, and look forward to coming to Ybor City. I looked at your reel, which I liked – strangely just the other day I was looking at the inside of these tulips I bought and I was thinking “I should animate these…”
    It’d be nice to meet you if you come to Ybor City!
    Francesca

    • David C. Montgomery says:

      I say go for it in respect to animating the tulips. My advice for flowers is to not be afraid to pick and prod and unless you’re going for wilting and decay be fast. I often dissect blossoms to get to some of the unique patterns inside or at the base of petals. I’m hoping to make it to Ybor City for the weekend.

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